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23rd Asia Pacific Pharma Congress, will be organized around the theme “De Novo Advancements in Pharmaceutical Sciences ”

Asia Pharma 2020 is comprised of keynote and speakers sessions on latest cutting edge research designed to offer comprehensive global discussions that address current issues in Asia Pharma 2020

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Intellectual property (IP) is a category of property that includes intangible creations of the human intellect.Intellectual property encompasses two types of rights: industrial property rights (trademarks, patents, designations of origin, industrial designs and models) and copyright.It was not until the 19th century that the term "intellectual property" began to be used, and not until the late 20th century that it became commonplace in the majority of the world

Regulatory affairs (RA), also called government affairs, is a profession within regulated industries, such as pharmaceuticals, medical devices, agrochemicals (plant protection products and fertilizers), energy, banking, telecom etc. Regulatory affairs also has a very specific meaning within the healthcare industries (pharmaceuticals, medical devices, biologics and functional foods).

Regulatory affairs (medical affairs) professionals (aka regulatory professionals) usually have responsibility for the following general areas

  • Working with federal, state, and local regulatory agencies and personnel on specific issues affecting their business, i.e., working with such agencies as the Food and Drug Administration or European Medicines Agency (pharmaceuticals and medical devices); The Department of Energy; or the Securities and Exchange Commission (banking).
  • Advising their companies on the regulatory aspects and climate that would affect proposed activities. i.e. describing the "regulatory climate" around issues such as the promotion of prescription drugs and Sarbanes-Oxley compliance.
  • The Agreement provides norms and standards in respect of following areas of intellectual properties are Patents, Trademarks, copyrights, Geographical indications, Industrial designs.

 

  • Track 1-1Drug Regulations and Organizations
  • Track 1-2Regulations and Organizations
  • Track 1-3Global Pharma Products Registration
  • Track 1-4Intellectual Property Law for Generics and Innovator Rights
  • Track 1-5Safety and Quality Regulation in Labelling
  • Track 1-6Antimicrobial Activity and Disinfection
Pharmacognosy is the study of plants or other natural sources as a possible source of drugs. The American Society of Pharmacognosy defines pharmacognosy as "the study of the physical, chemical, biochemical and biological properties of drugs, drug substances or potential drugs or drug substances of natural origin as well as the search for new drugs from natural sources
 
Phytochemistry is the study of phytochemicals, which are chemicals derived from plants. Those studying phytochemistry strive to describe the structures of the large number of secondary metabolic compounds found in plants, the functions of these compounds in human and plant biology, and the biosynthesis of these compounds. Plants synthesize phytochemicals for many reasons, including to protect themselves against insect attacks and plant diseases. Phytochemicals in food plants are often active in human biology, and in many cases have health benefits. The compounds found in plants are of many kinds, but most are in four major biochemical classes, the alkaloids, glycosides, polyphenols, and terpenes

 

 

  • Track 2-1Drug Discovery Research in Pharmacognosy
  • Track 2-2Industrial Pharmacognosy
  • Track 2-3Drugs from Natural Sources
  • Track 2-4Herbal Drug Analysis Methods
  • Track 2-5Pharmacoergasy

Pharmaceutics is the discipline of pharmacy that deals with the process of turning a new chemical entity (NCE) or old drugs into a medication to be used safely and effectively by patients. It is also called the science of dosage form design. There are many chemicals with pharmacological properties, but need special measures to help them achieve therapeutically relevant amounts at their sites of action. Pharmaceutics helps relate the formulation of drugs to their delivery and disposition in the body.Pharmaceutics deals with the formulation of a pure drug substance into a dosage form. Branches of pharmaceutics include Pharmaceutical formulation, Pharmaceutical manufacturing, Dispensing pharmacy, Pharmaceutical technology, Physical pharmacy, Pharmaceutical jurisprudence

Pharmacotherapy is therapy using pharmaceutical drugs,as distinguished from therapy using surgery (surgical therapy), radiation (radiation therapy), movement (physical therapy), or other modes. Among physicians, sometimes the term medical therapy refers specifically to pharmacotherapy as opposed to surgical or other therapy; for example, in oncology, medical oncology is thus distinguished from surgical oncology

 

  • Track 3-1Pharmacoepidimiology and Pharmacotherapy
  • Track 3-2Drug Interactions and Adverse Drug Reactions
  • Track 3-3Pre-formulation Considerations
  • Track 3-4Pharmaceutical Technology
  • Track 3-5Advances in Pharmacodynamics & Pharmacokinetics
Nanomedicine is the medical application of nanotechnology.Nanomedicine ranges from the medical applications of nanomaterials and biological devices, to nanoelectronic biosensors, and even possible future applications of molecular nanotechnology such as biological machines. Current problems for nanomedicine involve understanding the issues related to toxicity and environmental impact of nanoscale materials (materials whose structure is on the scale of nanometers, i.e. billionths of a meter).
Nanotechnology ("nanotech") is manipulation of matter on an atomic, molecular, and supramolecular scale. The earliest, widespread description of nanotechnology referred to the particular technological goal of precisely manipulating atoms and molecules for fabrication of macroscale products, also now referred to as molecular nanotechnology. A more generalized description of nanotechnology was subsequently established by the National Nanotechnology Initiative, which defines nanotechnology as the manipulation of matter with at least one dimension sized from 1 to 100 nanometers. This definition reflects the fact that quantum mechanical effects are important at this quantum-realm scale, and so the definition shifted from a particular technological goal to a research category inclusive of all types of research and technologies that deal with the special properties of matter which occur below the given size threshold.
  • Track 4-1Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery Systems
  • Track 4-2Sustained Drug Delivery System
  • Track 4-3Recent Advances in Drug Delivery System
  • Track 4-4Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology
  • Track 4-5Nanotechnology and Therapeutic Delivery
Industry pharmacy discovers, develops, produces, and markets drugs or pharmaceutical drugs for use as medications to be administered (or self-administered) to patients to cure them, vaccinate them, or alleviate a symptom.Pharmaceutical companies may deal in generic or brand medications and medical devices. They are subject to a variety of laws and regulations that govern the patenting, testing, safety, efficacy and marketing of drugs.
Physical pharmacy is the branch of pharmacy that concentrates on the application of physics and chemistry to the study of pharmacy. In other words, it is the study of the effects dosage forms have on their environment by addressing issues at the molecular level.It emphasis on the physical characteristics and actions of the drug delivery system before the same is given to the patient.It forms the basis for design, manufacture, and distribution of drug products and serves as the foundation for the stable and proper use of medical drugs.It covers areas such as solubility, pharmacokinetics and drug delivery
  • Track 5-1Product Management
  • Track 5-2Physical Pharmacy Practice
  • Track 5-3Post- Marketing Surveillance
  • Track 5-4Supply Chain Management
  • Track 5-5Good Manufacturing Practices
  • Track 5-6Industrial Pharmaceutics
  • Track 5-7Drug Discovery and Development
Pharmacology is the branch of biology concerned with the study of drug action,where a drug can be broadly defined as any man-made, natural, or endogenous (from within the body) molecule which exerts a biochemical or physiological effect on the cell, tissue, organ, or organism (sometimes the word pharmacon is used as a term to encompass these endogenous and exogenous bioactive species). More specifically, it is the study of the interactions that occur between a living organism and chemicals that affect normal or abnormal biochemical function. If substances have medicinal properties, they are considered pharmaceuticals
 
Toxicology is a discipline, overlapping with biology, chemistry, pharmacology, and medicine, that involves the study of the adverse effects of chemical substances on living organisms and the practice of diagnosing and treating exposures to toxins and toxicants. The relationship between dose and its effects on the exposed organism is of high significance in toxicology. Factors that influence chemical toxicity include the dosage (and whether it is acute or chronic), route of exposure, species, age, sex, and environment. Toxicologists are experts on poisons and poisoning
 
  • Track 6-1Reverse Pharmacology
  • Track 6-2Regulatory Toxicology
  • Track 6-3Clinical Efficacy and Safety Evaluation
  • Track 6-4Drug Interactions and Pharmacological Compatibilities
  • Track 6-5Plant Toxicology
Medicinal chemistry and pharmaceutical chemistry are disciplines at the intersection of chemistry, especially synthetic organic chemistry, and pharmacology and various other biological specialties, where they are involved with design, chemical synthesis and development for market of pharmaceutical agents, or bio-active molecules (drugs).
Compounds used as medicines are most often organic compounds, which are often divided into the broad classes of small organic molecules (e.g., atorvastatin, fluticasone, clopidogrel) and "biologics" (infliximab, erythropoietin, insulin glargine), the latter of which are most often medicinal preparations of proteins (natural and recombinant antibodies, hormones, etc.). Inorganic and organometallic compounds are also useful as drugs (e.g., lithium and platinum-based agents such as lithium carbonate and cisplatin as well as gallium)

 

  • Track 7-1Chemistry of Natural Products
  • Track 7-2Advanced Medicinal Chemistry
  • Track 7-3Advances in Pharmaceutical Organic Chemistry
  • Track 7-4Molecular Drug Design
  • Track 7-5Green Techniques for Organic Synthesis and Medicinal Chemistry
  • Track 7-6Advances in Drug Discovery
  • Track 7-7Computational Chemistry
Pharmaceutical Analysis is about studying and knowing about the uses of instruments and methods which used to separate, identify, and quantify matter.In practice, separation, identification or quantification may constitute the entire analysis or be combined with another method. Separation isolates analytes. Qualitative analysis identifies analytes, while quantitative analysis determines the numerical amount or concentration.
Pharmaceutical Analysis consists of classical, wet chemical methods and modern, instrumental methods.Classical qualitative methods use separations such as precipitation, extraction, and distillation. Identification may be based on differences in color, odor, melting point, boiling point, radioactivity or reactivity. Classical quantitative analysis uses mass or volume changes to quantify amount. Instrumental methods may be used to separate samples using chromatography, electrophoresis or field flow fractionation. Then qualitative and quantitative analysis can be performed, often with the same instrument and may use light interaction, heat interaction, electric fields or magnetic fields. Often the same instrument can separate, identify and quantify an analyte.
Analytical chemistry is also focused on improvements in experimental design, chemometrics, and the creation of new measurement tools. Analytical chemistry has broad applications to forensics, medicine, science and engineering

 

  • Track 8-1Novel Approaches to Analytical and Bioanalytical Methods
  • Track 8-2Bioanalytical Techniques
  • Track 8-3Chromatography and Techniques
  • Track 8-4Spectroscopic Techniques
  • Track 8-5Spectroscopic Techniques
  • Track 8-6Nuclear Magnetic Resonanace
  • Track 8-7Mass Spectroscopy
  • Track 8-8Regulatory Issues and Biosafety Challenges in Bioanalysis
  • Track 8-9Applications of Analytical and Bioanalytical Methods

Pharmaceutical Microbiology is an applied branch of Microbiology. It involves the study of microorganisms associated with the manufacture of pharmaceuticals e.g. minimizing the number of microorganisms in a process environment, excluding microorganisms and microbial biproducts like exotoxin and endotoxin from water and other starting materials, and ensuring the finished pharmaceutical product is sterile.Other aspects of pharmaceutical microbiology include the research and development of anti-infective agents, the use of microorganisms to detect mutagenic and carcinogenic activity in prospective drugs, and the use of microorganisms in the manufacture of pharmaceutical products like insulin and human growth hormone.

  • Track 9-1Microbial Contamination
  • Track 9-2Intermediates, APIs, Excipients and Drug Substances
  • Track 9-3Critical Microbiology Quality Attributes
  • Track 9-4Strategies for Maintaining Non-sterile Manufacturing Environment
Pharmaceutical Biotechnology (commonly abbreviated as biotech) is the broad area of biology involving living systems and organisms to develop or make products, or "any technological application that uses biological systems, living organisms, or derivatives thereof, to make or modify products or processes for specific use" (UN Convention on Biological Diversity, Art.Depending on the tools and applications, it often overlaps with the (related) fields of molecular biology, bio-engineering, biomedical engineering, biomanufacturing, molecular engineering, etc.
For thousands of years, humankind has used biotechnology in agriculture, food production, and medicine.The term is largely believed to have been coined in 1919 by Hungarian engineer Károly Ereky. In the late 20th and early 21st centuries, biotechnology has expanded to include new and diverse sciences such as genomics, recombinant gene techniques, applied immunology, and development of pharmaceutical therapies and diagnostic tests.
  • Track 10-1Biomedical Data Engineering
  • Track 10-2Bioinformatics Engineering
  • Track 10-3Industrial Pharma Biotechnology
  • Track 10-4Genetics & Genetic Engineering
  • Track 10-5Tissue Engineering
Molecular biology is a branch of biology that concerns the molecular basis of biological activity between biomolecules in the various systems of a cell, including the interactions between DNA, RNA, proteins and their biosynthesis, as well as the regulation of these interactions.Writing in Nature in 1961, William Astbury described molecular biology as an approach from the viewpoint of the so-called basic sciences with the leading idea of searching below the large-scale manifestations of classical biology for the corresponding molecular plan. It is concerned particularly with the forms of biological molecules is predominantly three-dimensional and structural – which does not mean, however, that it is merely a refinement of morphology. It must at the same time inquire into genesis and function
Molecular biology is the study of molecular underpinnings of the processes of replication, transcription, translation, and cell function. The central dogma of molecular biology where genetic material is transcribed into RNA and then translated into protein, despite being oversimplified, still provides a good starting point for understanding the field. The picture has been revised in light of emerging novel roles for RNA
Biochemistry is the study of the chemical substances and vital processes occurring in live organisms. Biochemists focus heavily on the role, function, and structure of biomolecules. The study of the chemistry behind biological processes and the synthesis of biologically active molecules are examples of biochemistry
  • Track 11-1Computational Chemistry
  • Track 11-2Protein Biosynthesis, Protein Folding and Global Protein Analysis and Function
  • Track 11-3Biomolecules
  • Track 11-4Molecular Drug Design
  • Track 11-5Structure Activity Relationship
  • Track 11-6Immunochemistry
Clinical pharmacy is the branch of pharmacy in which clinical pharmacists provide direct patient care that optimizes the use of medication and promotes health, wellness, and disease prevention.Clinical pharmacists care for patients in all health care settings but the clinical pharmacy movement initially began inside hospitals and clinics. Clinical pharmacists often work in collaboration with physicians, nurse practitioners, and other healthcare professionals.Clinical pharmacists can enter into a formal collaborative practice agreement with another healthcare provider, generally one or more physicians, that allows pharmacists to prescribe medications and order laboratory tests
Hospital pharmacies are pharmacies usually found within the premises of a hospital. Hospital pharmacies usually stock a larger range of medications, including more specialized and investigational medications (medicines that are being studied, but have not yet been approved), than would be feasible in the community setting. Hospital pharmacies typically provide medications for the hospitalized patients only, and are not retail establishments and therefore typically do not provide prescription service to the public. Some hospitals do have retail pharmacies within them (see illustration), which provide over-the-counter as well as prescription medications to the public, but these are not the actual hospital pharmacy
  • Track 12-1Pharmacist Key Role in Treatment
  • Track 12-2Role of Clinical Pharmacist
  • Track 12-3Challenges in Compounding and Dispensing Pharmacy
  • Track 12-4Role of Hospital Pharmacists
Drug safety relates to the potential for adverse effects related to the administration of drugs. Efforts to establish the safely profile of drugs begin early in their development, with in vitro and in vivo toxicity testing, and continue through clinical trials leading up to drug approval and following approval in specific post-marketing studies or general pharmacovigilance efforts
Pharmacovigilance (PV or PhV), also known as drug safety, is the pharmacological science relating to the collection, detection, assessment, monitoring, and prevention of adverse effects with pharmaceutical products.The etymological roots for the word "pharmacovigilance" are: pharmakon (Greek for drug) and vigilare (Latin for to keep watch). As such, pharmacovigilance heavily focuses on adverse drug reactions, or ADRs, which are defined as any response to a drug which is noxious and unintended, including lack of efficacy (the condition that this definition only applies with the doses normally used for the prophylaxis, diagnosis or therapy of disease, or for the modification of physiological disorder function was excluded with the latest amendment of the applicable legislation).Medication errors such as overdose, and misuse and abuse of a drug as well as drug exposure during pregnancy and breastfeeding, are also of interest, even without an adverse event, because they may result in an adverse drug reaction
 
  • Track 13-1Signal Detection in Drug Safety
  • Track 13-2Consulting on Risk Management
  • Track 13-3Adverse Event Reporting
  • Track 13-4Postmarketing Drug Safety

Clinical trials are experiments or observations done in clinical research. Such prospective biomedical or behavioral research studies on human participants are designed to answer specific questions about biomedical or behavioral interventions, including new treatments (such as novel vaccines, drugs, dietary choices, dietary supplements, and medical devices) and known interventions that warrant further study and comparison. Clinical trials generate data on safety and efficacy.They are conducted only after they have received health authority/ethics committee approval in the country where approval of the therapy is sought. These authorities are responsible for vetting the risk/benefit ratio of the trial  their approval does not mean that the therapy is safe or effective, only that the trial may be conducted

  • Track 14-1Research Methodology
  • Track 14-2Recent Updates on Clinical Trials
  • Track 14-3Clinical Molecular Genetics
  • Track 14-4Clinical Immunology
  • Track 14-5Clinical Drug Development and Therapeutics
  • Track 14-6Clinical Research and Methodology
Pharmacogenetics is the study of inherited genetic differences in drug metabolic pathways (and other pharmacological principles, like enzymes, messengers and receptors) which can affect individual responses to drugs, both in terms of therapeutic effect as well as adverse effects.The term pharmacogenetics is often used interchangeably with the term pharmacogenomics which also investigates the role of acquired and inherited genetic differences in relation to drug response and drug behaviour through a systematic examination of genes, gene products, and inter- and intra-individual variation in gene expression and function.
In oncology, pharmacogenetics historically is the study of germline mutations (e.g., single-nucleotide polymorphisms affecting genes coding for liver enzymes responsible for drug deposition and pharmacokinetics), whereas pharmacogenomics refers to somatic mutations in tumoral DNA leading to alteration in drug response (e.g., KRAS mutations in patients treated with anti-Her1 biologics).Pharmacogenetics is believed to account for inter-ethnic differences (e.g., between patients of Asian, Caucasian and African descent) in adverse events and efficacy profiles of many widely used drugs in cancer chemotherapy
  • Track 15-1Cancer Pharmcogenetics
  • Track 15-2Recent Advances in DNA Repair
  • Track 15-3Methods To Determine Biological Targeting
  • Track 15-4T Cell Modulation and Immune Response
  • Track 15-5Mutagenecity and Genotoxicity
Green Pharmacy deals with environmental, economical and social aspects of pharmacy. In the present stage the focus will be on environmental issues along the whole lifecycle of a pharmaceutical entity. This involves resources and energy input but also with waste issues for example during the synthesis and production of an active pharmaceutical ingredient. Furthermore, it would also look on the compounds themselves and will aim to improve the degradability of the compounds after their use in the environment to reduce the environmental risk caused by pharmaceuticals in the environment. Another issue is the people using pharmaceuticals such as pharmacists, medical doctors and patients.  
Community pharmacy is a pharmacy that deals directly with people in the local area. It has responsibilities including compounding, counseling, checking and dispensing of prescription drugs to the patients with care, accuracy, and legality. A community pharmacy has appropriate procurement, storage, dispensing and documentation of medicines. It is an important branch of the pharmacy profession and involves a registered pharmacist with the education, skills and competence to deliver the professional service to the community.
  • Track 16-1Good Governance in Pharmacy
  • Track 16-2Ethics in Pharmacy
  • Track 16-3Future Trends in Green Pharmacy
  • Track 16-4Role of Community Pharmacist
  • Track 16-5Green Technologies in Pharmaceutical Industry

A nutraceutical is a pharmaceutical- and standardized nutrient.In the US, "nutraceuticals" do not exist as a regulatory category; they are regulated as dietary supplements and food additives by the FDA under the authority of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.Nutraceuticals are usually natural substances and, unlike drugs, are not substances synthesized for a certain purpose .Nutraceuticals are also called functional foods, which are defined as “food products to be taken as part of the usual diet in order to have beneficial effects that go beyond basic nutritional function”.Nutraceutical product is a food or fortified food product that not only supplements the diet but also assists in treating or preventing disease (apart from anemia), so provides medical benefits.Nutraceuticals are not tested and regulated to the extent of pharmaceutical drugs. The word nutraceutical is combined from the words nutrition and pharmaceutical.

 
 
 
  • Track 17-1Herbal & Traditional Medicine
  • Track 17-2Natural Medicine Products
  • Track 17-3Nutraceuticals in Cancer Therapy
  • Track 17-4Dietary Supplements & Functional Foods
  • Track 17-5Prebiotics & Probiotics
The role of pharmacy education, pharmacist licensing, and continuing education vary from country to country and between regions/localities within countries. In most countries, pharmacists must obtain a university degree at a pharmacy school or related institution, and/or satisfy other national/local credentialing requirements. In many contexts, students must first complete pre-professional (undergraduate) coursework, followed by about four years of professional academic studies to obtain a degree in pharmacy (such as Doctorate of Pharmacy). Pharmacists are educated in pharmacology, pharmacognosy, chemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry, pharmaceutical chemistry, microbiology, pharmacy practice (including drug interactions, medicine monitoring, medication management), pharmaceutics, pharmacy law, physiology, anatomy, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, drug delivery, pharmaceutical care, nephrology, hepatology, and compounding of medications. Additional curriculum may cover diagnosis with emphasis on laboratory tests, disease state management, therapeutics and prescribing (selecting the most appropriate medication for a given patient).
Upon graduation, pharmacists are licensed, either nationally or regionally, to dispense medication of various types in the areas they have trained for. Some may undergo further specialized training, such as in cardiology or oncology
  • Track 18-1Clinical Practice Guidelines
  • Track 18-2Patient Centered Pharmacy Practice
  • Track 18-3Global Technical Standards
  • Track 18-4Critical View of Pharmacy Education

Pharmaceutical Care is the pharmacologist/pharmacist’s contribution to the care of individuals in order to optimize medicines use and improve health outcomes’.The ultimate goal of pharmaceutical care (optimize medicines use and improving health outcomes) exists in all practice settings and in all cultures where medicines are used. It involves two major functions: identifying potential and manifest problems in the pharmacotherapy (DRPs), and then resolving the problems and preventing the potential problems from becoming real for the patient and his therapy outcomes. This should preferably be done together with other health care professionals and the patient through a review of the medication (and diseases) and subsequent counselling and discussions

  • Track 19-1Pharmaceutical Care Management
  • Track 19-2Health Care Management and Providers
  • Track 19-3Medical Billing Softwares
  • Track 19-4Medication Management Services
Drug manufacturing is the process of industrial-scale synthesis of pharmaceutical drugs by pharmaceutical companies. The process of drug manufacturing can be broken down into a series of unit operations, such as milling, granulation, coating, tablet pressing, and others.
Good manufacturing practice guidelines provide guidance for manufacturing, testing, and quality assurance in order to ensure that a manufactured product is safe for human consumption or use. Many countries have legislated that manufacturers follow GMP procedures and create their own GMP guidelines that correspond with their legislation.All guideline follows a few basic principles.
  • Track 20-1Regulatory Compliance
  • Track 20-2Risk Management
  • Track 20-3Patient Compliance
  • Track 20-4Data Integration